6 Week 10K Beginner Training Schedule

Whether you’re a seasoned runner looking to achieve a new personal best, or you’ve set yourself a new year’s resolution to run your very first marathon, a 10K race is one that requires proper planning and preparation.

A 10K race will require you to run just over 6 miles, so you’ll need to make sure that you’ve effectively built up your stamina before the big day so that you achieve that goal.

Not quite there yet? No problem - we’re here to help you get ready! 

6 Week 10K Beginner Training Schedule

Below, you’ll find an easy to follow 6-week training plan that runners of all levels can use.

If you follow it correctly and carry it out within the 6-week time frame, you’ll be prepared and ready to tackle your first 10K or tick off a new personal best. Let’s jump in! 

What will the 10K consist of?

Before we talk you through the 6-week plan, we think that it’s a good idea to first discuss what the 10K run will actually entail.

Depending on the course, you’ll likely find yourself taking over half an hour to complete the run, with many beginners hitting around the 45-minute mark.

In addition to this, it’s also worth being aware that for the majority of the run, you’ll be relying on around 90% of your aerobic energy, which is where your body generates energy via the oxygen present in your blood.

It will sustain you throughout the run, with the general notion being that a lot of energy will be released over a longer period of time.

This means that, for the remaining 10%, you’ll be relying on your anaerobic energy production, which is where your body will break down glucose without using oxygen.

As anaerobic energy is based on the notion of a lot of energy being used up in a short period of time, you’ll likely access this energy during moments that you need more intensity, such as towards the end of the run when you see the finish line. 

How do I prepare for the 10K?

To effectively prepare yourself for the 10K run, you’ll need to dedicate time to practicing endurance work in order to build your aerobic system’s capacity. 

Regardless of whether you’re a beginner or not, the very best way to do this is through periods of long-running.

Like we mentioned above, though aerobic energy is generally deemed to be ‘slow release’ energy, it will lay the foundation for your race, allowing you to be more consistent and on your tip-top form. 

Below, you’ll find our 6-week training schedule. We have put a heavy emphasis on long-running periods, which you’ll see consistently scattered throughout the schedule.

You’ll also notice that we dedicated days for cross-training, which we’ll leave up to you as to what those days will consist of.

Cross-training can be all types of different strength training exercises, such as swimming or cycling, it’s entirely up to you and what feels right for your body. 

In addition to runs and cross-training, you’ll also find that we’ve incorporated hill running into the final weeks.

If you own a treadmill, you can pop it onto an incline in order to really push your aerobic system.

Similarly, if you plan on running in your local area, we recommend incorporating a few hill climbs on the specified days to really prepare your aerobic capacity. 

Week 1

Monday: 2-mile run

Tuesday: Rest

Wednesday: Cross-training

Thursday: 3-mile run

Friday: Rest day

Saturday: 3-mile run

Sunday: Rest

Week 2

Monday: 2-mile run

Tuesday: Rest

Wednesday: Cross-training

Thursday: 3-mile run

Friday: Rest 

Saturday: 4-mile run

Sunday: Rest or cross-training

Week 3

Monday: 3-mile run

Tuesday: Rest day

Wednesday: Cross-training

Thursday: 3-mile run

Friday: Rest

Saturday: 4-mile run

Sunday: Rest or cross-training

Week 4

Monday: 3-mile run

Tuesday: Rest day

Wednesday: Cross-training

Thursday: 3-mile run with hills

Friday: Rest day

Saturday: 5-mile run

Sunday: Rest day or cross-training

Week 5

Monday: 4-mile run

Tuesday: Rest day

Wednesday: Cross-training

Thursday: 3-mile run with hills

Friday: Rest day

Saturday: 5-mile run

Sunday: Rest day or cross-training

Week 6

Monday: 3-mile run

Tuesday: Rest day

Wednesday: 3-mile run

Thursday: Rest day or light cross-training

Friday: Rest day

Saturday: Rest day

Sunday: Race day

Final Words

So, there you have it! We hope that this guide has been helpful to you.

Make sure to make a note of the schedule or bookmark this page so that you always know where it is. 

Remember, it’s important to allow your body to recover throughout the 6-week process, so don’t forget to listen to your body and make sure that you’re taking rest days.

Good luck! 

Suzie
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