Half Marathon Intermediate Training Schedule – 8 Weeks

Have you already completed a half marathon and have another one coming up this year? If so, you will want to train sufficiently to complete the marathon as comfortably as possible.

If you have kept up with your running routine, there is no need to wait around for months to do another half marathon.

This 8-week half marathon training schedule will ensure you are race-ready for running the marathon to the best of your abilities.

Half Marathon Intermediate Training Schedule - 8 Weeks

This training program is designed for runners who have already completed a half marathon or have at least been running consistently for several months.

If you’re a running novice and looking to start a schedule to run a certain distance, check out our other programs geared towards beginners.

To start this training schedule, you’ll need to have a running base of around 15 miles per week while being able to run about 6 miles with relative comfort.

If you haven’t run for a few months or are not at this standard yet, we recommend you try a longer training period of about 12 weeks to ensure your body can cope with the demands that will come with these schedules.

If you’re confident and tick all the right boxes for this schedule, let’s not wait any longer and find out what the schedule has in store for you!

Your weekly training runs

Your weekly training will include a few types of runs: tempo runs, interval runs, long runs, and easy pace runs. The schedule below will tell you how often you will do these runs and at what pace.

You should try and avoid doing tempo runs, interval runs, and long runs on continuous days to prevent wearing yourself out.

You should take rest days or do cross-training instead such as swimming, walking, yoga, or biking.

The schedule below doesn’t tell you what to do on any specific day. You have the freedom to decide when you want to run and rest.

Bear in mind that most runners prefer to do long runs on Saturdays or Sundays as this is when they have more time. Nonetheless, you should do what works best for you.

Tempo Run

Tempo runs (TR) are run at an easy pace. This is for starting your weekly routine. For advanced runners who may want to run some extra miles, you can make your warm-ups and cool-downs a little longer.

For tempo runs, you should run at the pace of a 10K race or your half-marathon speed. This means you should be running at a pace that is comfortably hard.

This can be measured between 6-7 on the RPE (rating of perceived exertion) scale of 1-10.

Interval Run

An interval run (IR) repeats a certain distance such as 400 meters at your 10K race or half-marathon pace. You then take periods of recovery after each interval.

An example would be running 4 x 800 meters at a 10K pace with a 2-minute 30-second recovery in between.

This would mean running four 800 meter repeats with 2 minutes and 30 seconds of easy running or walking between the repeats.

The best thing about interval runs is that you can do them anywhere such as on a treadmill or, the most recommended, on a track.

Make sure you warm-up at an easy, comfortable pace before doing the intervals/recoveries for the number of repeats set in the schedule. Finish each interval with around 10 minutes at an easy pace.

Long Run

Long runs (LR) are completed at a comfortable pace where you can keep a conversation easily over the set mileage. Sections of some long runs will be done at a given pace which is based on your targeted race pace or TRP.

If you’re unsure of your TRP, you can find out with a race time estimator calculator to estimate your half-marathon race time.

Easy Runs and Cross-Training

These can be completed on the days of the week where your schedule permits you to.

You will have the choice of a few rest days or cross-training days each week but you must take at least one rest day per week to prevent possible injuries.

Just like your long runs, your easy runs should be done at a comfortable pace at which you can speak easily.

Cross-training can be any activity other than running that you enjoy doing. These can include cycling, swimming, yoga, strength training, and even dancing.

This should be performed with moderate intensity with at least one day per week involving strength training. If you can manage two days, you should go for it!

These strengthening workouts don’t need to be for long periods or too intense. Just partake in some simple bodyweight exercises to keep your joints and muscles moving.

Warming Up and Cooling Down

Your warm-ups and cool-downs should be done at an easy pace. These can be an easy paced run or a normal walk. To warm-up, you can do some gentle stretching to reduce the chances of muscle soreness and lessen any risk of injuries.

You can also do some warm-up exercises such as jumping jacks, butt kicks, and squats. These will raise your body temperature and increase blood flow to your muscles.

Now that you know what to expect, let’s keep going so you can start your 8-week training program right away!

Half Marathon Intermediate Training Schedule - 8 Weeks

If you have completed a half-marathon before or run regularly, you have probably taken part in similar schedules. 

However long it has been, the first week or so can prove difficult but don’t worry! This is completely normal.

You will soon feel your stamina growing stronger through each day and in just 8 weeks, you’ll be running with newborn endurance! Let’s start!

Week 1

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Do this for 1 mile at an easy pace for a warm-up; then 1 mile at tempo pace; finish with a 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): Do a 10-minute warm-up; 6 x 400m at 10K pace with a 90-second recovery (at an easy pace) in between; finish with a 10-minute cooldown

Run no 3: Long run (LR): Complete 6 miles at an easy, comfortable pace

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Complete 4 miles

Week 2

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Do this for 1-mile at an easy pace for your warm-up; 1 mile at tempo pace; finish with a 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): Do a 10-minute warm-up; 4 x 800m at 10K pace, with 400m recovery in between; Cool-down for 10-minutes

Run no 3: Long run (LR): Run 8 miles at an easy, comfortable pace

Run no 4: Easy Run (ER): Run for 4 miles

Week 3

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Run for 2-miles at an easy pace for warm-up; 2 miles at tempo pace; finish with a 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): Complete a 10-minute warm-up; 400m, 800m, 1200m, 800m, 400m at 10K pace, with 400m recovery in between; 10-minute cooldown

Run no 3: Long run (LR): Run for 9 miles at TRP (targeted race pace) plus 30 seconds/mile

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Run for 5 miles

Week 4

Remember, you can stay on any given week and repeat the schedule if you find it is going too quickly for you.

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Do this for 1-mile at an easy pace for warm-up; 2 miles at tempo pace; 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): A 10-minute warm-up; 6 x 400m at 10K pace, with 400m recovery in between; finish with a 10-minute cooldown

Run no 3: Long run (LR): 10 miles at an easy, comfortable pace. Finish with 2 miles at TRP

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Run for 4 miles

Week 5

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Run for 1-mile at an easy pace for your warm-up; 3 miles at tempo pace; finish with a 5-minute cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): A 10-minute warm-up; 5 x 800m at 10K pace, with 90-seconds of recovery in between; 10-minute cooldown

Run no 3: Long run (LR): 12 miles at an easy, comfortable pace

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Run for 3 miles

Week 6

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Run 1 -mile at an easy pace for your warm-up; 3 miles at tempo pace; finish with a 5-minute cooldown

Run no 2: Interval run (IR): 10-minute warm-up; 400m, 800m, 1600m, 800m, 400m at 10K pace, with a 400m recovery in between; 10-minute cooldown

Run no 3: Long run (LR): 10 miles at an easy, comfortable pace. Finish with 2 miles at TRP

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Run for 3 miles

Week 7

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Run for 1-mile at an easy pace for your warm-up; 3 miles at tempo pace; finish with a 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Easy run (ER): Run for 5 miles

Run no 3: Long run (LR): Run for 6 miles at an easy pace

Run no 4: Easy run (ER): Run for 3 miles

Week 8

Welcome to the final frontier! Congratulations on getting this far. Let’s finish this program!

Run no 1: Tempo run (TR): Run for 1-mile at an easy pace for your warm-up; 2 miles at tempo pace; finish with a 1-mile cooldown

Run no 2: Easy run (ER): Run for 3 miles

Run no 3: Easy run (ER): Run for 2 miles

HALF-MARATHON RACE DAY!

Suzie

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